Friday, 22 May 2009

It's war!

It's time to get serious with the  little slimy garden munchers!

So, I've been patient.  I've been nice.  I've even shared my booze with them (unheard of)!  I've thrown everything at them, including the kitchen sink, but nothing works!

I was devastated to discover that they have suddenly taken a fancy to some of my Dactylorhiza species of native terrestrial orchids!!  This is crossing the line!  Not only did they wait for the plants to throw up flower spikes, but they watched me get excited and then hit me hard when I was most vulnerable.  Well, no more!

I have invested in the rather frowned upon blue pellets.  I will also kill on first sight.  No warnings will be issued as in previous years.  Now its personal!  The zero tolerance approach has begun and I WILL succeed!!

11 comments:

  1. An old margarine tub, a trowel and some boiling water are quite effective.

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  2. Just nuke them into next week, I always do. According to some specialists nuclear power is very eco friendly. ;-)

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  3. I thought the harsh winter would have knocked them back, but oh no. I spoke to the owner of Bowden Hostas last year and he swore by scattering his first pellets around plants on Valentine's Day. Apparently February 14 triggers an amorous gene in the pesky molluscs, so dusting the soil with the poisonous blue hundreds and thousands prevents them mating. Try it next year.

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  4. I thought the harsh winter would have knocked them back, but oh no. According to the owner of Bowden Hostas, who knows a thing or two about slugs and snails (as you can imagine), the best time to start applying the poisonous blue hundreds and thousands is on Valentine’s Day. Apparently the slimy molluscs become amorous at this time, so a scattering of pellets at this time will stop them mating.

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  5. Make sure you get the ones that are organic. I learnt the other day that the other type actually attracts slugs so will cause more damage to your plants

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  6. I'm going with the copper tape, personally, round the tops of pots, and nematodes. I hate the idea of doing slug pellets, I just can't quite face it. But looking at my courgette plants this morning I definitely felt tempted. The problem with pellets is demonstrated by my allotment next door neighbour - he has scattered them about an inch thick, but his brassicas are still getting munched, because they're not a barrier, they're a deterrent. Go with copper barrier every time!

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  7. Good luck! I hope you win the battle~

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  8. Sluggo is good, it works. Also, if your soil is dry (not after or before a rain), try diatomaceous earth. Totally safe and it WILL keep them off your prized plants.

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  9. Two days of heavy rain, and the little buggers have decided to show their slimy trails. They are EVERYWHERE. I have yet to find anything that really works.

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  10. I'm not a fan of these 'snails with no hats' and in the old days I went round the garden with a pair of scissors!!!!!! worked for me.
    Nowadays with 12 hens to keep me busy I find a small receptacle and a prodder I collect them up and throw them in with the girls for their breakfast/midnight feast.........

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  11. Although initially I did not notice a huge difference, aftr 5 years of using nemaslug I have far fewer problems (admittedly in combination with pellets, copper tape, eggshells and the like)and notice far fewer slugs. I have however developed a bit of a snail problem now instead!

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